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Today at the JC

Having just signed on, fellow travellers, the journey continues. The communication between Psychologist, DA and also GP is slow. Why? Who knows, but at the same time I'm constantly reminded of the JC's urgency in getting me onto the Work Programme or some such. If there are people that think the unemployment service is run well then please tell them to seek medical help. It seems that the DA has the final say in whether Work Choices, a scheme sold to me on the basis of being the best suited for my needs, is indeed suitable.


But the Disability Adviser isn't a doctor; my GP is a doctor, he knows me better and would probably endorse (and how !) my entering this scheme. The Psychologist is a doctor (well you know what I mean), and she suggested it. The DA however isn't, and is more concerned, it seems, how much it might cost the DWP (as opposed to the Work Programme, which of course is free isn't it! Er!).


Anyway I'm repeating what I posted yesterday. Mind you that was a stream of consciousness masquerading as insanity so I'd be surprised if anyone could follow that!


I was given a work from home opportunity to apply for this week. The job involves researching information from websites, whatever that means. It lists a btinternet email address and a company I've never heard of. Now for all I know this could be the greatest opportunity I'll ever see; it could be 100% legitimate. Or it could involve me giving sensitive information (bank account details, NI number, etc - whatever is needed to log me as a proper working person and to get paid). How can I know for sure? Does the JC vet the positions they receive? I bet the answer is no. Having agreed to apply for this, I'm committed to that course of action and have to see it through on pain of sanction. Is it really too much to ask for these jobs to come with as much of a rubber stamp of legitimacy and security as is possible? As far as I'm aware anyone can submit a vacancy with as little info as possible, and that's certainly the case here.

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I Fucking Hate the Work Programme

That did not go well.
My legs were wobbly to begin with as I closed in on the church that passes for the office of the employment wing of the Salvation Army. My appointment was 3 to half past. I really did feel sick. Pretty early on, when he asked for the forms he gave me last time to fill in, I knew that what was arranged on the letter (a short interview with me bringing my CV and jobsearch) was actually going to be much longer. I also knew that, come half three when I had to leave to catch my bus back ten minutes later, I was going to have problems. 
Unfortunately, though more for me I fear, it never got that far; at 20 past he terminated the interview citing my apparent 'putting up barriers' as the reason not to continue. This was because I refused consent for him to keep my CV. I asked why he needed it and offered, three times, to show it to him (that's all), he said it was to apply for jobs on my behalf. The EEC's need this information.
What's an EEC? Employm…

Anybody Out There?

Just so I can be sure this is being read at all and decide whether it's worth continuing, please shout out in the comments. Even if you think I'm talking barmy bollocks, it'd be helpful to know if there are people reading this and not weird bots from phishing sites or Russian hackers or some weird sentient algorithm.

Apologies if you are none of those things, but I'm considering what to do with this blog.

Thanks

ADD

Thursday today (unless time has confused me again!), the day between yesterday's appointment with The Psychologist, and signing on tomorrow. A brief oasis for me to discuss said appointment as it was a test for 'neurodiverse tendencies'. I think that's the best way of putting it; it's all a bit vague really. When I first saw The Psychologist I mentioned that I was in the process of trying to get a diagnosis for Aspergers to which she replied she could do a test that, while not an official diagnosis, could count towards one - or something. Something official anyway, though bizarrely after the test was completed (took a couple of hours) she said she wasn't trained for Aspergers specifically.

The test itself was a kind of Krypton Factor lite (sans exercise course): a mix of recall, pattern recognition, problem solving, and questionnaire. I was asked to arrange coloured blocks into a prescribed pattern, to spot what was missing from a series of pictures, to guess fr…